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OwnerJuly 2015 to presentEl Cerrito

Finding best available technologies for meeting energy needs today and tomorrow: energy efficiency, demand response,, solar, wind, electric vehicles, biofuels and smart grid. It’s all the innovations that make the energy we use more secure, clean, and affordable. The energy world's best hopes lie in what's happening in the digital realm, especially in data analytics.

Friday, January 29, 2016

Markets and Pricing


If consumers are willing to accept more variability in price, they can get a discount from a flat base rate because the cost of delivering service goes down


Back to Smart Energy





friday january 29, 2016 
(In Draft)
On December 17, 2015 the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) voted 4-1 (Sandoval in opposition) to increase the Power Charge Indifference Adjustment (PCIA) exit fee by an unprecedented 95%, making the PG&E exit fee almost the highest it has ever been. This would result in an average MCE customer paying $156 per year and in total would result in approximately $36 million being collected by PG&E from MCE customers in 2016. This increase was approved, despite overwhelming statewide advocacy urging the CPUC to limit the fee.

The CPUC will hold a workshop on PCIA calculations on March 8, 2016.
.


J. Revenue Decoupling
saturday, september 26, 2015
By breaking the link between the utility's sales and profits, decoupling creates an incentive for utilities to sell less energy and focus on energy efficiency.


I.  Community Solar

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2015 
“What if everyone, absolutely everyone, could own their own solar panels?”




H. California Net Metering 
monday, november 3, 2014 
The solar industry and the state’s utilities disagree over just what impact net metering has on electricity rates, utility costs and grid operations.





G. Texas Retail Electricity Market 
TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 2014
Electricity deregulation allows multiple companies to compete for business in an electric market, but some argue that the system implemented in Texas in 2002 has led to higher prices for consumers.



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2013
Smart meters don't offer much value to consumers unless coupled with dynamic pricing, California PUC is currently researching whether or not to replace tiered rates.


E. Community Choice Aggregation
THURSDAY, AUGUST 16, 2012
Procures renewable sources of electricity and partners with a utility to distribute energy to local communities, You get all the advantages of cleaner, greener, healthier energy consumption AND all of the advantages of the established, experienced energy provider.


D. Wholesale Electricity Markets
sunday, august 5, 2012
Once generated, electricity must be able to instantaneously find an end use. The precise balancing act between creating electricity and getting it to the end user requires the ultimate just-in-time market.

Regulatory market to create competition can also hamper smart grid development. The rules force separation of supply, wholesale transmission, and retail distribution functions. But all those areas need to coordinate to optimize smart grid planning and data usage.



MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2012
Obligates utilities to buy renewable electricity at above-market rates set by the government.



monday, October 31, 2011
How will frequency regulation and load management be monetized?



MondaY, june 11, 2011
Experience in the introduction of retail competition has been mixed







PCIA and Community Choice

Navigate this Report
Back to Markets & Pricing Index

On December 17, 2015 the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) voted 4-1 (Sandoval in opposition) to increase the Power Charge Indifference Adjustment (PCIA) exit fee by an unprecedented 95%, making the PG&E exit fee almost the highest it has ever been. This would result in an average MCE customer paying $156 per year and in total would result in approximately $36 million being collected by PG&E from MCE customers in 2016. This increase was approved, despite overwhelming statewide advocacy urging the CPUC to limit the fee.



1. Background
2. Acronyms/Definitions
3. Business Case
4. Benefits
5. Risks/Issues
6. Success Criteria
7. Next Steps
8. Parties 
9. Links

1.Background
  • xxx
  • On December 17, 2016 the CPUC adopted Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PG&E) 2016 electric procurement cost revenue requirement forecast of $4,772.0 million for PG&E, which consists of:
    •  $4,277.7 million for the Energy Resource Recovery Account, 
    • $187.3 million for the Ongoing Competition Transition Charge, 
    • $118.7 million for the Power Charge Indifference Amount, and 
    • $188.3 million for the Cost Allocation Mechanism;
  • Approves PG&E’s 2016 electric sales forecast and rate proposals associated with its electric procurement related revenue requirements to be effective in rates January 1, 2016

  • Orders that a workshop be held in the first half of 2016, outside of this proceeding, by the Commission’s Energy Division, to address the methodologies and inputs used for calculating the Power Charge Indifference Amount, with notice of this workshop provided to the service lists of all currently open ERRA proceedings, both forecast and compliance; and
  • xxx
  • At the same December 17, 2015 meeting,  the Commission issued a decision that ordered the Commission’s Energy Division to hold a workshop within the first quarter of 2016, to address the methodologies and inputs used for calculating the PCIA.1 The scope of the workshop will include:
    1. the methodology for calculating the PCIA; 
    2. whether the calculation of the PCIA should be different for DA and CCA entities, and if so, what those different methodologies should be; 
    3. the inputs to the calculation of the PCIA; and 
    4. ensuring that all proposals are in compliance with existing Public Utilities Code Sections, including but not limited to ensuring no bias or harm to DA, CCA, or bundled customers
     The Commission ordered that parties may conduct discovery in advance of the workshop.
  • March 12, 2015 Workshop
    • Participants PG&E, SCE, SDG&E, MCE,  City of Lancaster, and the Direct Access Parties (through their representative MRW Associates)
    •  The purpose of the Workshop was to address two issues identified in the Ruling: 
      • 1. Whether departure dates used to establish vintage for departing customers for Community Choice Aggregation (“CCA”) service territories should be tied to the individual customer, or the service point address.
      •  2. Should new service points established in a CCA service area after the phase in date be assigned Power Charge Indifference (“PCIA”) vintages. 
    • x
  • How PCIA is calculated currently 
    • PCIA Customer Vintages are tied to the property (i.e. Service Point)
    • Once a customer at a designated Service Point departs from bundled service to join a CCA, that particular Service Point is attributed a Customer Vintage based upon the date of the customer’s departure
    • If that customer moves from the Service Point, the Customer Vintage stay tied to that Service Point, not to the customer. 
    • When a new service point is initiated within a CCA’s service territory, it is assigned a customer vintage that corresponds with start of service date for that service point.  PG&E assumes it will be the default load provider for all new load growth within communities served by CCAs

2. Acronyms/Definitions
  1. CTC - Competition Transition Charge - Intended to recover legacy ctentsagned prior to December20, 1995 from non exempt departing customers.

  2. Direct Access -The right of customers to choose between different electricity suppliers, just as they choose between other goods and service providers, from cellular carriers and internet service providers to grocery stores.
  3. Direct Access - Comparison of CCA to Direct Access (“DA”), on issue of tying vintage to customer vs. service point

  4. ERRA - Energy Resource Recovery Account - x

  5. ESP - Energy Service Provider - An entity that offers electrical service to customers within the service territories of PG&E, SCE and SDG&E and which has met state registration requirements.

  6. PCIA - Power Charge Indifference Amount -
    Indifference = Ongoing CTC + PCIA
    PCIA = Indifference-Ongoing CTC

  7. VPCIA - Vintaged Power Charge Indifference Adjustment 

    There are three methods of calculating VPCIA
    1. Launch-Date based vintaging methodology - MCE and Lancaster reiterated their proposal for a PCIA vintaging methodology based on the CCA phase-in date.  MCE wants to consider customer vintages holistically, from the community perspective. MCE’s proposal is that the whole community gets the same vintage date, which is administratively simple.
    2. Individual customer based vintaging methodology - PG&E and SCE support a PCIA vintaging methodology based on an individual basis, whether it be tracked to the service point address or the individual customer. Both utilities are concerned with customers that choose to remain a bundled customer at the time of CCA phase in, and then later switch to CCA service. This results in bundled service customers incurring stranded costs on behalf of departing customers.

      PG&E argues as of 2012, PG&E had been procuring on behalf of load in a CCAs territory. When the 2012 forecast was developed, MCE had just formed and there was only a small amount of load, so the 2012 forecast does not reflect load for MCE’s region. Even for the 2014 LTPP forecast, there is not separate treatment of CCA by region. PG&E contends that it still has procurement responsibility for regional load growth, and MCE’s proposal to apply 2010 vintage to all customers in MCE territory is inconsistent with how the LTPP load forecast reflects CCA load. So long as PG&E has the provider of last resort responsibility, it is appropriate to adjust customer vintages.

      Clarification requested by the City of Lancaster on how PG&E distinguishes itself as the provider of last resort when the CCA program is the default provider.  PG&E: PG&E distinguishes between the two based on the notion of “obligation to serve.” While a CCA program may be the default provider, if a customer opts out of a CCA program, the law states that the investor-owned utility (“IOU”) serving that region must serve the customer. CCAs are voluntary. 
    3. Service point address based vintaging methodology  The service point approach creates a disconnect between customer and CCA participation; if a customer has chosen CCA service, that customer could lose his or her vintage by moving. Attaching the vintage to the customer resolves that issues, but MCE’s preferred approach is to tie the community/geographic region to phase-in dates. MCE’s approach is the most simple because vintages would just be tied to phasein date for a particular area. MCE is concerned that continually re-setting vintages creates stranded cost issues and improvements need to be made here and in the LTPP.

      From the customers’ perspective their ‘choice’ to take CCA service is reset every time they move 2. Each time an unbundled customer is assigned a new PCIA Vintage, they on the hook for new stranded costs incurred after their initial choice to leave bundled service 3. Loyal CCA customers are effectively penalized by PCIA Vintages if they move.

      PG&E Rebuttal to Launch Date vintaging: zzz

      Hypothetical #1  
      • CCA service becomes available in 2010 in specific area 
      • Customer remains a bundled customer in 2010; the investor-owned utility (IOU) retains the obligation to serve the customer 
      • This customer later becomes a CCA customer in 2020 
      • Existing PG&E Policy: Customer would receive 2020 vintage 
      • MCE Proposal: Customer would receive 2010 vintage

      Hypothetical #2 
      • CCA service becomes available in 2010 in specific area 
      • Customer becomes a CCA customer in 2010 
      • \The customer returns to PG&E’s bundled service in 2012; the IOU now has the obligation to serve the customer 
      • The customer returns to CCA service in 2020 
      • Existing PG&E Policy: Customer would receive 2020 vintage 
      • MCE Proposal: Customer would receive 2010 vintage

  • xxx
  • 3. Business Case
    • On December 17, 2015, the CPUC ruled that  challenges to the Commission’s existing policy and/or rules are beyond the scope of  PG&E's  2016 Energy Resource Recovery Account (ERRA) proceeding and must be raised via a Petition for Modification of the decision that established the policy and/or rule in question. Also, many of the policy issues raised by parties would impact California’s other Investor-Owned Utilities (IOUs), which are not parties in this proceeding. This proceeding is limited to a year ahead forecast for a single utility and thus is not the appropriate venue for addressing broad policy issues that impact all of California’s IOUs. Therefore, this issue was not considered in this proceeding.
    • Instead, it is being considered under PG&E's 2015 Energy Resource Recovery Account (ERRA) proceeding  The second phase of the 2015 proceeding examines the application of PCIA vintages to:

      1) departing customers serviced by Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) providers, and
      2) new service points established in CCA territories after the phase-in date.

      The First Amended Scope was additionally served on Southern California Electric Company (SCE) and San Diego Gas & Electric Company (SDG&E). Pursuant to the First Amended Scope, a workshop was held on Mar 12, 2015, PG&E filed and served its workshop report on Mar 27, 2015; Opening comments to the workshop report were submitted on Apr 30, 2015 by SCE and jointly by Marin Clean Energy (MCE) and the City of Lancaster (Lancaster); Reply Comments were submitted on May 15, 2015 by PG&E and SCE. 
    • In the First Amended Scope, the Commission sought to examine two issues related to PCIA vintaging methodology:

      1) Whether departure dates used to establish vintage for departing customers in CCA service territories should be tied to the individual customer, or the service point address; and
      2) Whether new service points established in a CCA service area after the phase-in date should be assigned PCIA vintages.

      During the workshop and through their comments, MCE and Lancaster reiterated their proposal for a PCIA vintaging methodology based on the CCA phase-in date rather than the two options currently contemplated in the First Amended Scope. MCE and Lancaster cite extensively to past Commission decisions relating to the establishment of CCA programs as contemplating a launch-date based vintaging methodology. MCE contends its customers are being assigned a new vintage each time they move to a service address that had previously opted out of CCA service.
    • PG&E asserts a number of factors, some of which are outside PG&E’s control, that have caused PG&E’s forecasted PCIA to increase, including: 
      • 1) The expiration of the California Department of Water Resources contracts;
      •  2) Decreases in market prices, which have the effect of lowering the market price benchmark and increasing stranded costs associated with contracts entered into on behalf of departing customer; 
      • 3) Changes in PG&E’s portfolio mix; 
      • 4) Other factors such as a reduction in Department of Energy Litigation funds.
    • XXX
    4. Benefits
    • xxx
    5. Risks/Issues
    • Anti-Competitive - MCE believes that the increase in customer bills, resulting from PG&E’s PCIA request, is unfair and anti-competitive.
    6. Success Criteria
    1. xxx
    Next Steps Parties  have been asked by the CPUC to provide briefing on the following for the March 8, 2016 workshop
    • How should past Commission decisions and resolutions be interpreted to determine PCIA vintaging methodology for CCA customers. Please specify how a proposed vintaging methodology should affect the customer’s PCIA in each of the following scenarios:xxx
      1. Current CCA customer moves to a new address where the prior customer also had CCA service; 
      2. Current CCA customer moves to a new address where the prior customer had opted out of CCA service and remained a bundled customer;
      3.  New CCA customer moves into an address where the prior customer had CCA service; 
      4. New CCA customer moves into an address where the prior customer had opted out of CCA service and remained a bundled customer; 
      5. New CCA customer moves into a new service point established within the CCA territory after the phase-in date; and 
      6. A customer in CCA territory that had previously opted out and remained a bundled service customer, but decides later to take CCA service instead.

  • Please identify any scenario not identified in question 1 and explain how a proposed vintaging methodology should affect the customer’s PCIA vintage in that scenario.   Rather than limiting vintaging methodology to the two options as previously identified in the First Amended Scope, the CPUC ask parties to come up with a method which complies with Commission precedent, reduces stranded costs to bundled customers, and allows for an eventual end to vintaging charges.
  • 8. Parties 
    1. AECA - Agricultural Energy Consumers Association -A not-for-profit agricultural advocacy organization dedicated to California energy issues. AECA was formed in 1991 by farmers and agricultural water managers concerned about skyrocketing energy costs.

    2. AReM - Alliance for Retail Energy Markets - The Alliance for Retail Energy Markets is a not for profit corporation that advocates for continued development of successful customer choice in retail energy markets and provides a focused voice for competitive energy retailers and their customers in selected public policy forums on the state level.

      The Alliance brings together many of the nation's leading retail energy suppliers, including Constellation NewEnergy, Direct Energy and Noble Americas Energy Solutions, collectively serving the majority of competitively served electric load in California

      ARem is a member of the California Alliance for Competitive Energy Solutions (CACES), a coalition of public and private entities that support lifting the suspension of Direct Access to the electricity market

    3. CLECA - California Large Energy Consumers Association -  An ad hoc group of large industrial electric customers of PG&E and Edison, active on electric rate and service issues since 1987. Member companies are found in the steel, cement, industrial gas and refined oil products industries
    4. CFBF -  California Farm Bureau Federation - Sacramento -

    5. DACC - Direct Access Customer Coalition -

    6. Lean Energy USA - Mill Valley - A non-profit, membership organization dedicated to the accelerated expansion and competitive success of clean energy CCA nationwide.

    7. MCE - Marin Clean Energy - San Rafael

    8. Modesto Irrigation District   /   Merced Irrigation District (Modesto/Merced).

    9. ORA - Office of Ratepayer Advocates - San Francisco - Statutory mission is to obtain the lowest possible rate for service consistent with reliable and safe service levels. In fulfilling this goal, ORA also advocates for customer and environmental protections.

    10. City and County of San Francisco - San Francisco is in the process of implementing a CCA program known as CleanPowerSF. San Francisco expects to begin providing service to San Francisco residents and business under CleanPowerSF in the spring of 2016. San Francisco has an interest in this proceeding because PG&E’s PCIA rate will impact CleanPowerSF’s service to its residents and businesses. In addition, adjustments to the PCIA will affect the rates of San Francisco’s constituents who are bundled customers. San Francisco seeks to ensure that the rates for all customers are fair.
    11. SCP - Sonoma Clean Power - Santa Rosa -



    9. Links
    1. xxx

    Thursday, January 21, 2016

    Skills

    Here's my skills cloud from my friends on Linkedin


    Source: Linkedin


    Source: Linkedin


    Process Improvement
    Integration
    Process Improvement
    Workshop Facilitation
    Business Process Improvement
    Supply Chain
    Performance Management
    Supply Chain Management
    Continuous Improvement
    Key Performance Indicators

    Business
    Process Management
    Management
    Operations Management
    Vendor Management
    Negotiation
    Change Management
    Cross-functional Team Leadership
    Training
    Contract Negotiation
    Logistics
    Transportation


    IT Management
    PMO
    IT Strategy
    SDLC
    Governance
    Enterprise Architecture
    Data Warehousing
    Outsourcing
    E-commerce
    ITIL
    Quality Assurance
    ERP
    Visio
    SharePoint



    Sales and Marketing
    Sales
    Marketing Strategy
    Competitive Intelligence
    Business Communications
    Sales Management
    Product Development
    Market Research
    Marketing
    CRM


    Project Management
    Project Management
    PMP
    PMO
    Portfolio Management
    Project Planning
    Software Project Management
    Program Management
    Resource Management



    Strategic Planning
    Strategy
    Strategic Planning
    Business Strategy
    Business Planning
    Business Analysis





    Curriculum Vitae Page


    Mark Miner
    529 Seaview Drive
    El Cerrito, CA 94530
    (510) 219-4064



    Skills - Here's my skills cloud from my friends on Linkedin

    Source: Linkedin

    Source: Linkedin


    Advanced Energy Economy Classes



    Owner
    Neural Energy Consulting

    July 2015 – Present (4 months) El Cerrito

    Finding best available technologies for meeting energy needs today and tomorrow: energy efficiency, demand response,, solar, wind, electric vehicles, biofuels and smart grid. It’s all the innovations that make the energy we use more secure, clean, and affordable.



    Principal
    Miner Energy Consulting

    May 2013 – July 2015 (2 years 3 months) El Cerrito, CA

    HERS Rating Service with Greenpoint Rating, T24 Energy Modeling and Project Prioritization and Management.

    The initial target market will be local home owners, local small business owners, contractors and real estate agents, Future services could include: training, supply chain analysis.







    Environmental Quality Committee
    El Cerrito
    April 2008 - Present ( 7 years, 7 months)


    The EQC goals are to:
    1. Promote community and individual action and engagement
    2. Involve learners of all ages
    3. Help businesses and residents be more sustainable and environmentally friendly
    4. Inform and champion the City’s environmental policies and ordinances
    5. Reduce greenhouse gas emissions
    6. Change material use patterns by encouraging Reduction, Reuse, Recycling & Composting
    7. Champion energy efficiency, renewable energy generation, and efficient transportation
    8. Minimize hazardous chemical use and human/environmental exposures to toxics
    9. Protect & create open green space, maintain and restore natural areas with an emphasis on native ecosystems, and encourage a network of human/wildlife friendly green habitat throughout developed areas
    10. Support sustainable water use, healthy creeks, and green infrastructure







    Chair Environmental Quality Committee

    El Cerrito
    Jan 2013 -  Apr 2015 (2 years 3 months)

    Accomplishments

    Recurring activities:
    • Organized semi-monthly Green Team volunteer work parties (including clean-ups and invasive plant removal), to help the City keep priority areas and waterways clear of trash, and maintain public spaces and parks.
    • Recognized volunteer efforts an annual volunteer appreciation party
    • Held numerous successful environmentally themed film and lecture events with guest speakers and audience interaction (approximately 2-4 per year)
    • Hillside Festival and Music for Madera now recurring events
    2015:
    • After EQC lobbied for Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) options over several years, Council joined MCE as recommended
    • Assisted MCE with CCA outreach (energy film, Earth day and July 4th tabling)
    • Met our goal in the very successful $100k private fundraising campaign to help acquire the Madera open space connection for the Hillside Natural Area
    •  Reviewed and provided feedback on the Urban Greening Plan 
    • “Bee Haven” Pollinator Friendly Community ordinance 
    • Recommendation to Council to designate Priority Conservation Areas
    2014:
    • Fundraising toward purchase of the Madera Open Space. Cosponsored Hillside Fest and the Music for Madera Festiva
    • Green living workshops on residential home energy efficiency and drought resiliency
    • Input to the San Pablo Avenue Specific Plan, (Adopted 2014)
    •  Participated in the Ohlone Greenway reopening celebration and an Earth Hour event
    2013
    • Supported policy development and hosted public forums for El Cerrito Climate Action Plan 
    • Supported policy development and hosted public forums for Single Use Plastic Bags and EPS Foam Take Out Containers ordinances








    IT Governance Director 

    APL Limited
    2003 –  (4 years)


    • Responsible for IT project portfolio including strategic alignment, financial performance, project management, risk diversification, and resource utilization. 
    • Developed and implemented company wide project management standards 
    • Deployed and managed Primavera project and portfolio management software 
    • Ensured that IT investments adhered to the architecture standards. 
    • Established an IT governance structure to review major investment decisions and track progress 
    • Developed an IT communication program, targeted to the appropriate level, to educate end-users on the key components of our IT systems and strategies. Closed gaps in employee satisfaction with communications.








    IT Project Director

    APL Limited
    2000 - 2003  (3 years)


    • Implemented CRM System. Delivered the first application utilizing the new web based Enterprise Architecture. Built cross-functional teams to address and solve many difficult issues. Managed implementation of Enterprise Architecture.

    • Managed New Horizons IT Strategy Project








    Previous Positions

    APL Limited
     –  (17 years)
    • Information Exchange Director – Developed and implemented e-commerce strategies that allowed customers to perform core business transactions with APL electronically.

    • Market Research Director – developed business plans for new markets

    • Marketing Manager – managed worldwide annual sales budget process and developed market plans giving direction to regional and country sales management

    • Sales Manager - Developed and implemented small shipments sales strategies including partnership with a national LTL trucking company

    • Marketing Information Manager - Owner of large data warehouse supporting several hundred users


    Success Stories -


    Wednesday, January 20, 2016

    BYOD Smart Thermostat



    Navigate this Report
    Back to Load Shifting Index

    1. Background

    2. Acronyms/Definitions
    3. Business Case
    4. Benefits
    5. Risks/Issues
    6. Success Factors
    7. Case Studies
    8. Companies
    9. Links

    1.Background
    • Smart thermostats are considered “smart” because they automatically monitor and adjust themselves to better manage energy used for heating and cooling. Customers can control them remotely via Wi-Fi-connected devices such as smartphones, tablets and personal computers.

    • In most programs,  utilities provide specific thermostat

    • Many thermostat models and providers.  Installation decision.  Mixed results with self-installation.  5 year vs. 8 year payback for self-install is attractive, but too many problems and most utilities don’t do it this way.

    • The connected home is a coming trend.  See my coming blog post - Residential IoT - . Home Security, Lighting, Smart Connected Appliances in ranked order beyond Thermostat.



    Source: Navigant


    2. Acronyms/Definitions
    1. DR - Demand Response (See my Blog Post)

    2. Energy Management Devices -  Examples of these type of devices include programmable communicating thermostats (PCT) and plug load controllers that allow you to program settings. Some devices may also allow you to remotely control your HVAC and some small appliances

    3. IHD - In-Home Displays -  Energy information displays have the capability to receive near real-time energy use data and may help you identify high energy use appliances. IHDs aren’t specific to homes and may be used in businesses.

    4. PCT - Programmable Communicating Thermostat - xx

    3. Business Case
    • Despite the challenges, there is already a land grab going on among companies that want to be the utility’s gateway into the home, since it is increasingly clear that most utilities do not have the desire to build and manage sophisticated home area networks just for peak shaving purposes.

    • Offering only one thermostat model for a demand response (DR) program is not sustainable. Thermostat technology is advancing too quickly and customers want choices in device and features. Further, utilities cannot rely on command and control methods to grow residential DR programs due to changing market dynamics.

       Bring your own thermostat (BYOT) programs are currently in pilot phase, but will soon be ready for larger deployments. The BYOT model may prove to be less expensive than traditional DR programs, and it can increase energy efficiency program participation, enable dynamic pricing adoption, and engender greater customer engagement and satisfaction.

    • Program Design
      • Technology/equipment choices
        • Vendor and hardware - BYOD
        • Installation Methods
        • Communicatinos
      • Technology Services
      • Eligibility
      • Incentives
      • Dynamic Rates
      • Load control/temperature offset strategies
      • Smart Thermostat Program Design Decision Tree   - Source: Navigant

    • xxx



    4. Benefits
    • Reduced Capital Expenditures - Defer investment in generation/capacity,   Defer transmission and distribution (T&D) investments, address local network constraints

    • Reduced Energy Cost - Reduce energy supply costs (via economic dispatch)

    • Provision of ancillary services (e.g. spinning reserves)

    • Reduce GHG - Support expansion of intermittent renewables

    • Customer Engagement and Satisfaction - Support corporate strategy to engage the customer

    • Reduce Risk of Disintermediation - Provide a unique customer value.  Comfort control and temperature thresholds. Customers do not notice or opt out.

    • Customer control over bills


    5. Risks/Issues
    • Cannibalization of existing programs

    • Performance of Smart Thermostat Programs - xxx
      Source: Navigant

    • Cost - Thermostats more expensive and higher installation cost than switches,  A BYOD program saves the cost of the device, but adds additional cost in coordinating multiple vendors and customer touch points.

    • Complexity - How will utility manage so many vendors?

    • Marketing/Recruiting - Multiple touch points with the customer.  Is the device seller giving the same message?

    • Customer Incentive - $25 per year in demand response program savings is a small benefit, consumers may not want to join the program if they already have a thermostat.

    • Customer Awareness - Consumers have vague notions about  IoT products for their homes and most are ill-informed

    • Small Business - A difficult market to crack

    • Privacy  - Come connected devices that share usage data fuel worries about a loss of privacy and accessible personal data

    • Security - Despite the security layer built into IoT communications protocols, a connectec home will have multiple entry points that cybercriminals could exploit.

    • Customer Support - Which button to push? How will utility help desk troubleshot multiple devices?  Will field visits be necessary?

    • Legacy Paging Network - Vast majority of current thermostats are reached by paging. but paging networks in decline, but high cost to transition all at once.  Future of paging networks is uncertain

    • Residential Wi Fi Reliability - Residential Wi Fi WILL go offline.  However, since residents use Wi Fi all the time, availability is self-correcting.  Failed switches may not be reset by customer. If a switch goes down, resident may not notice and service could be disrupted for quite some time.

    • Devices - Some devices will come with limitations



    6. Success Factors
    1. Utilities should set the rules and be involved from the start
    2. Marketing - Program Design, Program Marketing, Participant Recruitment
    3. Engaging consumers in utility branded mobile apps
    4. Single source accountability for results
    5. Strong Vendor Management
    6. When enrolling customers, the web process must be smooth and easy, and embrace early adopters and ‘friendly installs’ (e.g. employees). 
    7. This process should also include developing a plan for renters and landlords, and, where practical, offer a choice between a professional installation and a self-install.
    7. Case Studies
    • Gulf Power (A Southern Company) - Energy Select Program
      • Piloting Bring Your Own Device, exploring technical feasibility of a TOU rate coupled with customer-owned wifi-communicating programmable thermostat.  Pilot participant savings will be compared with traditional Energy Select participants.
      • Utility provided thermostat available to all  active residential accountswith Gulf Power Company (not on Flat Bill rate) with Broadband Internet service, a properly working central cooling and heating system and ownership of your home or the homeowner's permission

      • Energy Select Value Proposition - For starters, you get a free programmable thermostat installed in your home. You're always in control — you can set your central cooling and heating system, electric water heater and pool pump to run automatically, only when you choose. And with secure online programming, you can program your thermostat on your computer, smart phone or tablet.

      • There are four elements that work as a system to help customers save money and energy on the Energy Select Program
        • Energy Select Rate (4 Tiers and lower than standard RS 87% of the time)
        • Price Responsive Programmable Thermostat (and timers)
        • Communicatins Gateway
        • Online Programming Portal

      • x
    • National Grid Smart Energy Solutions  London, England - National Grid formally launched its Smart Energy Solutions program available to 15,000 customers in Worcester, Mass. in January 2015 in compliance with the Massachusetts Green Communities Act of 2008, which required utilities to propose and gain approval for a smart grid pilot. Among the program’s features are time of use plans with bill protection, smart meters, a web portal, home energy management devices, demand response capabilities, and an opt-out option. It is the largest pilot of its kind in the Northeast.

      The program has incorporated a digital picture frame as one of the home energy management devices. This picture frame interface connects with relevant apps and the smart meter, and enables communication with the utility and with other home energy management devices in the home.

      In addition, customers have access to a Virtual Home app. “Through this new app, participants can view a layout of their home and click on different parts of the home to see how much energy they’re using,”

      There are two pricing plans, though 95% of pilot customers chose Smart Rewards:
      • Smart Rewards offers customers three different rates. For 330 days of the year, customers can choose to use energy on peak: (M-F 8am-8pm) or off-peak (M-F 8pm-8am & all day on weekends and holidays).  During designated Conservation Days there is a third rate that applies to hours designated as peak events. (Maximum of 30 peak event days.)
      • The Conservation Day Rebate Plan allows customers to remain on a flat basic service rate and earn a rebate at the end of the year for any savings achieved during conservation day peak events.


    • PG&E Smart Thermostat Study - This 12-month study—only open to a small group of participants—will help PG&E evaluate the innovative technology of smart thermostats. The goal of this study is to test new thermostat features and measure potential energy savings so PG&E can gather information that will help them determine incentives we may offer in the future.

      The smart thermostat and installation are free and participation in the study is easy. Plus, once the study is over, participants can keep the thermostats. The offer, however, is for a limited time and thermostats will only be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

    • SDG&E -  Home and Business Area Network Devices - Using a home or business area network, you now have the ability to connect devices within your home or business that can give detailed information about energy use as well as help manage and monitor your electricity use.

      The process seems simple, just fill out SDG&E's connection request form and they will notify you when your device has been connected to your meter. They allow 2-3 business days turn around time on requests which seems responsive.

      Reduce Your Use Rewards Program

    8. Companies

    1. Aztech Associates Inc.,  Kingston, Ontario - Incorporated in 1993, one of North America’s leading engineering firms, specializing in custom design and manufacturing. Develops innovative solutions that provide timely, accurate, actionable information about electricity usage. Serves home, business, commercial and industrial customers; and the utilities sector.

      Aztech also offers asset tracking and monitoring solutions for utility fleet tracking; as well as load control and metering tools.

    2. Ceivia Energy - Burbank, CA - Unit of electronic picture frame company that now makes in home energy displays/

    3. Ecobee Inc, Toronto, ON,  Delivers intelligent energy management solutions that enable residential and commercial customers to understand, manage, and reduce their energy consumption. It offers Smart Thermostat, which is the Internet enabled through Wi-Fi to monitor and manage home comfort; and Smart Si thermostat that allows to make adjustments to the thermostat on the go from tablets, computers, iPhones, or smartphones. The company also provides Energy Management System, a Wi-Fi enabled technology offered for the commercial market for total control, convenience of remote management, and online diagnostics; Smart energy solutions for utility customers; and add-ons, such as remote sensor modules and power supply products. It sells products through HVAC contractors and distributors in Canada, the United States, Mexico, and Australia. ecobee, Inc. was formerly known as Avaning Inc. and changed its name in October 2008. The company was founded in 2007 .



    4. Energate - Ottawa, ON - Offers thermostats, energy displays, load switches, and peripherals to manage and control home energy systems.  They provide a complete solution that includes software, portals, mobile applications, and wireless devices such as gateways, smart thermostats, load control switches, and consumer energy displays.

      With their standards-based open Consumer Connected Demand Response (CCDR) platform, you can interactively address residential demand and can empower your consumers to more effectively manage energy use while not compromising their comfort and convenience.

    5. Google Nest - (Actually Nest Labs subsidiary of Alphabet (https://abc.xyz))  home automation producer of programmable, self-learning, sensor-driven,Wi-Fi-enabled thermostats, smoke detectors, and other security systems. It introduced the Nest Learning Thermostat in 2011 as its first product. The Nest Protect smoke and carbon monoxide detector was then introduced in October 2013.  After the acquisition of Dropcam, the rebranded Nest Cam was introduced in June 2015

      Co-founded by former Apple engineers Tony Fadell and Matt Rogers in 2010, the start-up company quickly grew to have more than 130 employees by the end of 2012. Google acquired Nest Labs for US$3.2 billion in January 2014, when it had 280 employees, continuing the Nest brand identity. In November 2015, Nest Labs had grown into more than 1100 employees, with a new engineering center in Seattle.

    6. OPower - San Francisco, CA - Partnering with with Honeywell. The Opower Thermostat Platform, which currently only supports Wi-Fi Honeywell thermostats but will support others in the future, will be used by retail electric supplier Direct Energy for its load control program.

    7. Rainforest Information - Vancouver, BC - Makes products that allow utilities and their customers to manage real time energy use. Our Home Area Network (HAN) devices, software products and services enable Energy Efficiency and Demand Response programs for utilities, and provide automation convenience and reduced energy costs for residential and commercial consumers.

    9. Links
    1. Bring Your Own Thermostat Demand Response Revolution or Role Player? Navigant Research Webinar  January 19, 2016

    2. xxx

    Load Shifting


    *There is tremendous economic potential in load shifting.
     * The peak 2008 demand in California was 48,491 Megawatts.
     * 5% of the peak or 2,425 MW was only used for 15 hours of the year. At $2000/kW the capital cost of this capability was $4.8 billion. 

     * 10% of the peak or 4,849 MW was only used for 55 hours of the year. At $500/kW the capital cost of this capability was $9.6 billion.

    Back to Smart Energy





    F. Demand Response (DR)
    updated tuesday, february 2, 2016 
    A temporary change in electricity consumption in response to market or reliability conditions



    E. BYOD Smart Thermostat
    Wednesday, january 20, 2016
    Smart thermostats are considered “smart” because they automatically monitor and adjust themselves to better manage energy used for heating and cooling. Customers can control them remotely via Wi-Fi-connected devices such as smartphones, tablets and personal computers



    D. Auto DR (ADR)
    friday, SEPTEMBER 26, 2014 
    Use Internet based electricity pricing and demand-response signals to initiate pre-programmed control strategies that provide fully automated management of building energy use



    C. Demand Response Markets
    THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012
    It is estimated that a 5% lowering of demand would have resulted in a 50% price reduction during the peak hours of the California electricity crisis in 2000/2001. With consumers facing peak pricing and reducing their demand, the market should become more resilient to intentional withdrawal of offers from the supply side.



    B. Load Management
    TUESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2012
    20% of generating capacity exists only to meet peak demand, so it runs just 5% of the time and provides just 1% of supply. Peak demand reduction could save billions of dollars.


    A. Direct Load Control (DLC)
    TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 2011
    A utility or system operator remotely shuts down or cycles a customer’s electrical equipment on short notice to address system or local reliability contingencies. In exchange, the customer receives an incentive payment or bill credit.